Byzantine through Baroque

This is Me.

Andrew Braun

The Man, the Myth

The Legend

An Italo-Byzantine mosaic depicting the Biblical story of the flight to Egypt

(1) The Flight to Egypt, from the Florence Bapistery.

Andrew Braun is really not as conceited as his title implies, but when he writes about himself in the third person he likes to have some fun with the idea. A student of History, Sociology of Religion, and Writing at Geneva College, he loves learning about everything, but art tends to baffle  him. He does what he can, however, and enjoys smoking a pipe, sipping a whisky, and pretending he’s more philosophical than he actually is.

If you start talking to him about something he knows a lot about and enjoys, he has enough to hold you hostage for days, until you become a brain-dead (but very knowledgeable) zombie with only enough vocabulary left to say such essential phrases as, “That’s interesting,”

Flight into Egypt, Giotto. San Francesco, Assisi. An early Renaissance work.

(2) Giotto's "Flight into Egypt" from his frescoes in the Lower Church of Basilica di San Francesco in Assisi, Italy.

“Mm-hm. Cool,” “Wow, I never thought of that before,” and “Do you REALLY think squirrels are responsible for all the most heinous crimes in human history?”

A somewhat unorthodox representative of high renaissance religious art.

(3) Leonardo da Vinci's Virgin of the Rocks

He gets that last one entirely too often.

His approach to the topic of Mary is largely thematic, focusing on artistic representations of the Virgin Mary on the Holy Family’s Biblical flight  to Egypt from the Byzantine period through the Baroque. The development of artistic style is something of a subtheme in his arrangement, but mostly he prefers to examine the individual traits and historical background of individual paintings.

Shalom.

Carracci - Landscape with the Flight into Egypt

(5) Landscape with the Flight into Egypt by Annibale Carracci

Rest on the Flight into Egypt by Caravaggio

(4) Rest on the Flight into Egypt by Caravaggio

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